Sticky Article 2019 Virginia Election

2019 Virginia Election
Statewide Results Overview

General Election Summary

The 2019 General Election was an election in which all forty seats in the State Senate along with all one hundred seats in the House of Delegates. Given the narrow GOP majorities in both the House of Delegates (51-48)* and Senate of  Virginia (20-19)*, both parties spent unprecedented resources in several key contests to determine control of the General Assembly. Several national figures such as Vice President Mike Pence, former Vice President Joe Biden, Senator Kamala Harris, Senator Amy Klobuchar, Mayor Peter Buttigieg, and others visited Virginia to energize their party’s respective bases ahead of this election.

 

The 2019 General Election was made all of the more interesting when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a lower court ruling that found the Virginia House map had been racially gerrymandered. The new court drawn map made six Republican districts lean Democratic. As a result, the GOP had to spend resources protecting incumbent legislators such as Speaker Kirk Cox (R-Colonial Heights), Delegate Chris Jones (R-Suffolk), Delegate Chris Stolle (R-Virginia Beach), and Delegate David Yancey (R-Newport News), in addition to flipping several seats which were lost during the 2017 General Election.

 

In the Senate of Virginia, the contests were a bit less dramatic as there was no challenge to the Senate map. The Democrats sought challengers to most Republican incumbents, and at least three contests have turned out to be the highest profile races, with several others seen as ‘ones to watch.’ Senators Siobhan Dunnavant (R-Henrico) and Senator Glen Sturtevant (R-Richmond) had very competitive opponents, whilst Democrats focused on picking up two Senate seats held by retiring Republican Senators Frank Wagner (R-Virginia Beach) and Dick Black (R-Loudoun).

 

The amount of spending for this election broke record levels. As of 16 October, the total amount spent by both parties was nearly $53 million, up from $30 million in the last off-off year election cycle (2015). These numbers do not include the influx of last-minute donations from 30 September through Election Day. The final campaign finance reports will be due on 5 December 2019.

 

It is also worth noting that Virginia’s ‘off-off year’ election cycle featured a number of local contests throughout the Commonwealth. Perhaps most interesting was the seismic shift on the boards of supervisors in Virginia’s three largest localities – Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties. In summary, while the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors remains solidly Democratic, a number of retirements (40%) means that the new Fairfax County Board of Supervisors will be much different when it organizes in January. In Prince William County, a Democrat will chair the Board of Supervisors for the first time since 1999, and in Loudoun County, Republicans lost their governing majority through a series of competitive contests. A full summary of these board elections is attached to this report.

 

*There are legislative vacancies due to the resignation of Del. Matthew James, and retirement of Senator Frank Wagner.

 

General Assembly Election Results

Election Results for the State Senate

 

*Totals Accurate as of 11:37PM 11/6

 

Summary

With most of the returns reported, Democrats have gained control of the State Senate. As of this report, the Democratic Majority is 21-19. This is the first General Election since 2007 in which the Democrats have won outright control of the Senate. The Democrats did hold the majority for a brief period in 2014, when the chamber was 20-20 with then Lt. Governor Northam serving as a tie breaking vote.

 

Key Senate Contests:

7th Senate District: Republican Jennifer Kiggans narrowly Delegate Cheryl Turpin by 50.3%-49.4% in this Virginia Beach district vacated by former Senator Frank Wagner (R). This contest was one of the most expensive races during the cycle, and as of 24 October, the total amount raised by both candidates was $3.3 million. The 7th District has been a GOP district since 1996 when Republican Ed Schrock defeated Democrat Clarence Holland. A candidate paid recount is possible here if so requested.

 

10th Senate District: Ghazali Hashmi (D) defeated Sen. Glen Sturtevant (R) by 55%-45% in this Richmond based district. Governor Northam carried the 10th District by fifteen points in 2017 making this a very difficult re-election contest for Sturtevant. Notwithstanding some initial concerns amongst Democrats about the winner of the Democratic Primary, Ghazala Hashmi (D) raised enough money to run a competitive contest against Sturtevant. The results of this contest show the changing demographics of the Richmond suburbs, and notwithstanding Sturtevant’s efforts to moderate, the political climate and overall enthusiasm on the Democratic side proved to be insurmountable.  

 

12th Senate District: With 98.4% of precincts reporting in, Senator Siobhan Dunnavant (R) defeated Democrat Debra Rodman by a vote of 51.2%-48.6% in this suburban Richmond-based district. Like the other suburban Richmond districts, this race was highly competitive with both candidates spending unprecedented resources. Senator Dunnavant lost the higher density areas near Richmond but had strong gains in the Henrico portion of the 12th District. Dunnavant’s win was a key victory for Republicans as many thought this seat would flip given the recent trends in the district. 

 

13th Senate District: Bell (D) defeated Higgans (R) by 54%-46% this suburban Northern Virginia-based district. Governor Northam carried this district by eleven points in 2017, and was viewed throughout the campaign as the Democrats top pick-up opportunity. While Republicans continued to fund Higgins, most public polling indicated Bell would win the contest. This seat was created as part of the 2011 redistricting and was held by Republican Senator Dick Black who announced his retirement in early 2019.

 

 

Other Notable Senate Contests:

8th Senate District: Senator Bill DeSteph (R) narrowly defeated Missy Smasal (D) by 52%-48% in this Virginia Beach based district. While the Democrats recruited a top-tier candidate in this district, the overall demographics proved to favor Republicans, especially in a lower turnout election. Nevertheless, DeSteph’s well-funded opponent meant that he was unable to provide any support to his fellow Senate colleagues, nor down-ballot races such as in the 84th or 85th House Districts, which were highly competitive contests.

 

11th Senate District: Senator Amanda Chase (R) defeated Amanda Pohl (D) by 55%-45%  in this suburban Richmond district. While this is considered a safe Republican district, Chase ran a controversial campaign and did not receive much support from the Republican establishment. Some felt that this contest could be a re-do of the ‘Brat effect’ where Republicans either stayed home, or simply did not vote for former Congressman David Brat in 2018 as payback for his defeat of former Congressman Eric Cantor in 2014. Nevertheless, Chase did win but underperformed in her quest to seek a second term in the Senate.

 

17th Senate District: Senator Bryce Reeves (R) defeated Amy Laufer (D) by 52%-48% in this largely rural district. While Laufer proved to be a strong fundraiser ($1M), Senator Reeves also commanded a sizeable war chest and ran a strong campaign. This is a rapidly changing district and won that Reeves barely won in 2011. The mostly rural district is anchored by heavier populated areas such as the Charlottesville suburbs to the west, and D.C. exurbs to the east with Spotsylvania County and the City of Fredericksburg.

 

District-By-District Results

 

Senate District (SD)

Winner

Defeated

Notes

SD-1

Sen. Monty Mason

Unopposed

 

SD-2

Sen. Mamie Locke

Unopposed

 

SD-3

Sen. Tommy Norment (60.2%)

Herb Jones (39.5%)

 

SD-4

Sen. Ryan McDougle (62.8%)

Stan Scott (37%)

 

SD-5

Sen. Lionell Spruill

Unopposed

 

SD-6

Sen. Lynwood Lewis (59.7%)

Elizabeth Lankford (40.1%)

 

SD-7

Jen Kiggans (51%)

Del. Cheryl Turpin (48.8%)

 

SD-8

Sen. Bill DeSteph (52%)

Missy C. Smasal (47,9%)

 

SD-9

Sen. Jennifer McClellan

Unopposed

 

SD-10

Hashmi Ghazala (54.8%)

Sen. Glen Sturtevant (45.1%)

 

SD-11

Sen. Amanda Chase (55.1%)

Amanda Pohl (44.9%)

 

SD-12

Sen. Siobhan Dunnavant (51.2%)

Del. Debra Rodman (48.6%)

 

SD-13

Del. John Bell (54.3%)

Geary Higgans (45.6%)

 

SD-14

Sen. John Cosgrove (61.5%)

Rebecca Raveson (38.3%)

 

SD-15

Sen. Frank Ruff (68.2%)

Virginia Smith (31.7%)

 

SD-16

Joe Morrissey

Unopposed

 

SD-17

Sen. Bryce Reeves (51.6%)

Amy Laufer (48.1%)

 

SD-18

Sen. Louise Lucas

Unopposed

 

SD-19

Sen. David Suetterlein (71.7%)

Flo Ketner (28.2%)

 

SD-20

Sen. Bill Stanley

Unopposed

 

SD-21

Sen. John Edwards

Unopposed

 

SD-22

Sen. Mark Peake (62.8%)

Dakota Claytor (37.1%)

 

SD-23

Sen. Steve Newman

Unopposed

 

SD-24

Sen. Emmett Hanger (71.1%)

Annette Hyde (28.3%)

 

SD-25

Sen. Creigh Deeds

Unopposed

 

SD-26

Sen. Mark Obenshain (64.5%)

April Moore (35.4%)

 

SD-27

Sen. Jill Vogel (63.9%)

Ronnie Ross (36%)

 

SD-28

Sen. Richard Stuart (57.7%)

Qasim Rashid (42.3%)

 

SD-29

Sen. Jeremy McPike

Unopposed

 

SD-30

Sen. Adam Ebbin

Unopposed

 

SD-31

Sen. Barbara Favola

Unopposed

 

SD-32

Sen. Janet Howell (72.9%)

Arthur Purves (26.9%)

 

SD-33

Sen. Jennifer Boysko (64.9%)

Suzanne Fox (35.1%)

 

SD-34

Sen. Chap Petersen

Unopposed

 

SD-35

Sen. Dick Saslaw

Unopposed

 

SD-36

Sen. Scott Surovell

Unopposed

 

SD-37

Sen. Dave Marsden

Unopposed

 

SD-38

Sen. Ben Chafin

Unopposed

 

SD-39

Sen. George Barker (65.5%)

Dutch Hillenburg (34.4%)

 

SD-40

Del. Todd Pillion

Unopposed

 

 

 

 

General Assembly Election Results

Election Results for the House of Delegates

 

*Totals Accurate as of 11:37PM 11/6

 

Summary

With most of the returns reported, the Democrats have gained control of the House of Delegates. As of this report, the composition of the House of Delegates is (54-45). One contest, Del. Chris Stolle saw him ahead for most of the night but his Democratic opponent, Nancy Guy now leads by eighteen votes. This is the first time since 1996 that Democrats have had outright control of the House. With a new majority in the House of Delegates, Democrats now control all levers of power in Richmond – the Governorship, the Senate of Virginia, and the House of Delegates. Not since 1993 have Democrats held a complete lock on state government.

 

Key House of Delegates Contests:

10th House of Delegates: Delegate Wendy Gooditis defeated Randy Minchew by a vote of 53%-47% in this rematch between the two candidates. Del. Gooditis first won in 2017 when she defeated Minchew. This contest was seen as a must win for Republicans. The 10th District is a lean Republican district but has trended Democratic in the past few statewide contests.

 

28th House of Delegates: Democrat Josh Cole defeated Republican Paul Milde by a vote of 51.8%-47.8%. The 28th District contest was an interesting race starting in the summer when Milde defeated freshman Republican Delegate Bob Thomas. Del. Thomas first won the seat in 2017 when he narrowly defeated Josh Cole in a contest which was plagued with accusations of voter suppression and mis-assignment of registered voters by the Stafford County Registrar. Interestingly, reports during election day suggested that a similar mis-assignment of voters occurred in the 28th District.

 

40th House of Delegates: Democrat Dan Helmer has defeated Republican Tim Hugo by a vote of 53.5%-46.4%. The contest in the 40th is one of the most expensive House of Delegates races in history, with over $3 million spent as of 15 October. Hugo is the sole Republican legislator in Fairfax County, having narrowly won re-election in 2017 when he defeated his opponent by 99 votes. Helmer ran a strong and well-funded campaign and highlighted Hugo’s ties to the National Rifle Association. Despite running a ‘local issues’ campaign, Hugo was unable to overcome the unpopularity of President Trump and the Republican brand in Northern Virginia. Hugo’s defeat means there will be no Republicans representing Fairfax County in the House of Delegates.

 

50th House of Delegates: Democratic Lee Carter has defeated Republican Ian Lovejoy in this City of Manassas based district by a vote 53.3%-46.5%. Carter ran a streamlined campaign and relied on generic Democratic turnout in a district which Governor Northam beat Gillespie by sixteen points.

 

66th House of Delegates: This was a highly competitive contest between Speaker Kirk Cox (R-Colonial Heights) and Sheila Bynum-Coleman (D-Chesterfield). This contest became a lot more interesting when the 66th District was re-drawn as part of the court-ordered redistricting. This district shifted nearly thirty-two points from a 60% GOP district to a 46% Democratic district. Nevertheless, the Speaker’s high name identification, long-time involvement in the community, and background as a public educator help him withstand a challenge even in this new district. Ultimately, Speaker Cox defeated Bynum-Coleman by 51.5%-47.2%.

 

73rd House of Delegates: Democrat Rodney Willett has defeated Republican Mary Margaret Kastelberg by a vote of X-X. This seat was vacated by first-term Delegate Debra Rodman who ran for the 12th Senate District against Senator Siobhan Dunnavant. The 73rd District was flipped from red to blue in 2017 when Rodman defeated longtime Republican Delegate John O’Bannon. Willett is a twenty-year resident of Henrico County and is as an attorney.

 

76th House of Delegates: Democrat Clint Jenkins has defeated Republican Chris Jones. Despite concerns over the summer that he would not qualify for the ballot due to an error in his paperwork submission, Jenkins was able to get on the ballot and ran a well-funded campaign against Del. Jones. In addition, Jenkins benefitted from the court-ordered redistricting which shifted the 76th District nearly twenty-seven points to make it a Democratic district.Jenkins won 56.3%-43.5%.

 

83rd House of Delegates: Republican Delegate Chris Stolle has defeated Democrat Nancy Guy. The 83rd District was one of the districts impacted by the court-ordered redistricting earlier this year. The 83rd shifted nearly twelve points to become a lean Democratic district, though, Stolle ran a strong campaign and has high name identification as a member of the Stolle family. This was an expensive race and interest groups on both sides invested in the 83rd District. Delegate Stolle was first elected in 2009.

 

85th House of Delegates: Democrat Alex Askew has defeated Republican Rocky Holcomb by a vote of 51.8%-48%. Askew is a first-time candidate having previously served as a legislative aide to Del. Jay Jones (D-Norfolk). Askew is a Virginia Beach native and announced his candidacy following the decision by Del. Cheryl Turpin (D-Virginia Beach) to run for the Senate of Virginia.

 

94th House of Delegates: Democrat Shelley Simonds has defeated Del. David Yancey by a vote of 57.7%-40.3%. Simonds has previously challenged Yancey two times (2015, 2017) and benefitted from the court-ordered redistricting which shifted the district nearly fourteen points to become a sixty percent Democratic district. Simonds nearly won in 2017 but ended up tying with Del. Yancey during a recount. The result was that the State Board of Elections drew a name from a bowl to determine who would represent the 94th District. Del. Yancey’s name was drawn and he secured a fourth term.

 

Other Notable House Contests:

27th House of Delegates: Delegate Roxann Robinson (R) appears to have defeated Larry Barnett (D) in a rematch between the two candidates. Due to Robinson’s close election in 2017, there was some thought that she might be vulnerable in 2019, however, Del. Robinson ran a strong and disciplined campaign and was generally viewed as ahead for most of the cycle. While Barnett received some late money from the House Democratic Caucus, the district demographics proved to favor Robinson in this off-off year election cycle. 

 

72nd House of Delegates: Democrat Delegate Schuyler VanValkenburg defeated Republican challenger Gaydonna Vandergriff by a vote of 53.2%-46.7%. In an election which saw some surprise last minute funds from both sides, VanValkenburg was able to leverage his organization and some of the up-ballot races such as the contest between Rodman and Dunnavant for the 12th District. This turned out to be a competitive race.

 

75th House of Delegates: Democrat Rosalyn Tyler has survived a surprising challenge from Republican Otto Wachsmann. Republicans saw a potential pickup opportunity in this district as some shifting demographics and the court-ordered redistricting made the 73rd a more competitive contest. Republicans spent a decent amount of resources here and tried to surprise Del. Tyler. Ultimately, Del. Tyler narrowly survived re-election by a vote of 50.4%-49.5%. This race is subject to a candidate paid recount should Wachsmann so request.

 

84th House of Delegates: Republican Delegate Glenn Davis has defeated Democrat Karen Mallard. While the Democratic Caucus did not invest heavily here, Mallard had a sizeable cash advantage due to a $200,000 contribution from Emily’s List. Still, Davis carried the district by nearly four points in 2017, and ran ahead of Gillespie. This was another competitive election for Davis but he survived and defeated Mallard by a vote of 51.1%-48.74%.

 

100th House of Delegates: This contest was the inverse of the 75th District, where Democrat Phil Hernandez proved to be a prolific fundraiser and his campaign finally caught the attention of the GOP who showed concern over Bloxom’s fundraising and organization. While there was a lot of energy in this race amongst Democrats, Bloxom was able to stabilize and held the 100th.

 

District-By-District Results

 

House District (HD)

Winner

Defeated

Notes

HD-1

Del. Terry Kilgore

Unopposed

 

HD-2

Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy (60.3%)

Heather Mitchell (39.7%)

 

HD-3

Del. Will Morefield

Unopposed

 

HD-4

Del. Will Wampler (62.9%)

Starla Kiser (37%)

 

HD-5

Del. Israel O’Quinn

Unopposed

 

HD-6

Del. Jeff Campbell (75.2%)

Jim Barker (24.7%)

 

HD-7

Del. Nick Rush (66.8%)

Rhonda Seltz (33.2%)

 

HD-8

Del. Joe McNamara (66.4%)

Darlene Lewis (33.5%)

 

HD-9

Del. Charles Poindexter

Unopposed

 

HD-10

 

 

 

HD-11

Del. Sam Rasoul

Unopposed

 

HD-12

Del. Chris Hurst (53.4%)

Forrest Hite 46.3(%)

 

HD-13

Del. Danica Roem (56.9%)

Kelly McGinn (43.1%)

 

HD-14

Del. Danny Marshall (61.3%)

Eric Stamps (38.6%)

 

HD-15

Del. Todd Gilbert (74.4%)

Beverly Harrison (25.5%)

 

HD-16

Del. Les Adams

Unopposed

 

HD-17

Del. Chris Head

Unopposed

 

HD-18

Del. Michael Webert (60.3%)

Lara Galante (38,9%)

 

HD-19

Del. Terry Austin

Unopposed

 

HD-20

Del. John Avoli (58.5%)

Jennifer Lewis (41.4%)

 

HD-21

Del. Kelly Fowler (54.5%)

Shannon Kane (45.3%)

 

HD-22

Del. Kathy Byron (68.9%)

Jennifer Woofter (30.9%)

 

HD-23

Wendell Walker (63.9%)

David Zilles (35.9%)

 

HD-24

Del. Ronnie Campbell (66%)

Christian Worth (32.6%)

 

HD-25

Chris Runion (58.1%)

Jennifer Kitchen (40%)

 

HD-26

Del. Tony Wilt (54%)

Brent Finnegan (45.9%)

 

HD-27

Del. Roxann Robinson (%)

Larry Barnett (%)

 

HD-28

Joshua Cole (51.8%)

Paul Milde (47.8%)

 

HD-29

Del. Chris Collins (64.7%)

Irina Kahnin (35.3%)

 

HD-30

Del. Nick Freitas (57.9%)

Anne Ridgeway (42.1%)

 

HD-31

Del. Elizabeth Guzman (52.7%)

DJ Jordan (47.3%)

 

HD-32

Del. David Reid

Unopposed

 

HD-33

Del. David LaRock (57.2%)

Mavis Taintor (42.7%)

 

HD-34

Del. Kathleen Murphy 57.7(%)

Gary Pan (42.2%)

 

HD-35

Del. Mark Keam

Unopposed

 

HD-36

Del. Ken Plum

Unopposed

 

HD-37

Del. David Bulova

Unopposed

 

HD-38

Del. Kaye Kory

Unopposed

 

HD-39

Del. Vivian Watts (67.9%)

Nick Bell (31.9%)

 

HD-40

Dan Helmer (46.4%)

Del. Tim Hugo (53.5%)

 

HD-41

Del. Eileen Filler-Corn

Unopposed

 

HD-42

Del. Kathy Tran (59.5%)

Steve Adragna (40.4%)

 

HD-43

Del. Mark Sickles

Unopposed

 

HD-44

Del. Paul Krizek (70.5%)

Richard Hayden (29.3%)

 

HD-45

Del. Mark Levine

Unopposed

 

HD-46

Del. Charniele Herring

Unopposed

 

HD-47

Del. Patrick Hope

Unopposed

 

HD-48

Del. Rip Sullivan

Unopposed

 

HD-50

Del. Lee Carter (53.3%)

Ian Lovejoy (46.5%)

 

HD-51

Del. Hala Ayala (54.6%)

Rich Anderson (45.4%)

 

HD-52

Del. Luke Torian (73.6%)

Maria Martin (26.4%)

 

HD-53

Del. Marcus Simon

Unopposed

 

HD-54

Del. Bobby Orrock (58%)

Neri Canahui-Ortiz (41.9%)

 

HD-55

Del. Buddy Fowler (60.1%)

Morgan Goodman (39.8%)

 

HD-56

Del. John McGuire (61.4%)

Juanita J. Matkins (38.5%)

 

HD-57

Sally Hudson

Unopposed

 

HD-58

Del. Rob Bell (62.5%)

Elizabeth Alcorn (37.5%)

 

HD-59

Del. Matt Fariss (63.2%)

Tim Hickey (36.7%)

 

HD-60

Del. James Edmunds (65.9%)

Janie Zimmerman (34%)

 

HD-61

Del. Tommy Wright (66.8%)

Trudy Berry (33.1%)

 

HD-62

Carrie Coyner (53.6%)

Lindsey Dougherty (46.3%)

 

HD-63

Del. Lashrecse Aird

Unopposed

 

HD-64

Del. Emily Brewer (60.2%)

Michele Joyce (39.7%)

 

HD-65

Del. Lee Ware (65.3%)

Mike Asip (34.6%)

 

HD-66

Del. Kirk Cox (51.5%)

Sheila Bynum-Coleman (47.2%)

 

HD-67

Del. Karrie Delaney

Unopposed

 

HD-68

Del. Dawn Adams (56%)

Garrison Coward (44%)

 

HD-69

Del. Betsy Carr

Unopposed

 

HD-70

Del. Delores McQuinn

Unopposed

 

HD-71

Del. Jeff Bourne

Unopposed

 

HD-72

Del. S. VanValkenburg (46.7%)

G. Vandergriff (53.2%)

 

HD-73

Rodney Willett (52.2%)

M.M Kastelberg (47.6%)

 

HD-74

Del. Lamont Bagby

Unopposed

 

HD-75

Del. Rosalyn Tyler (50.4%)

Otto Wachsmann (49.5%)

 

HD-76

Clint Jenkins (56.3%)

Del. Chris Jones (43.5%)

 

HD-77

Del. Cliff Hayes

Unopposed

 

HD-78

Del. Jay Leftwich

Unopposed

 

HD-79

Del. Steve Heretick

Unopposed

 

HD-80

Don Scott (66%)

Jim Evans (23.3%)

 

HD-81

Del. Barry Knight (52.1%)

Len Myers (47.7%)

 

HD-82

Del. Jason Miyares (59.2%)

Gayle Johnson (40.7%)

 

HD-83

Nancy Guy

 (49.95%)

Del. Chris Stolle (49.87%)

*Likely Recount (18 Votes)

HD-84

Del. Glenn Davis (51.2%)

Karen Mallard (48.7%)

 

HD-85

Alex Askew

(51.7%)

Rocky Holcomb (48.2%)

 

HD-86

Ibraheem Samirah

Unopposed

 

HD-87

Suhas Subramanyam (61.8%)

Bill Drennan (38.2%)

 

HD-88

Del. Mark Cole (55.7%)

Jess Foster (44.1%)

 

HD-89

Del. Jay Jones

Unopposed

 

HD-90

Del. Joe Lindsey

Unopposed

 

HD-91

Martha Mugler (54.7%)

Colleen Holcomb (45%)

 

HD-92

Del. Jeion Ward

Unopposed

 

HD-93

Del. Mike Mullin (55.6%)

Heather Cordasco (44.3%)

 

HD-94

Shelly Simonds (57.7%)

Del. David Yancey (40.3%)

 

HD-95

Del. Cia Price

Unopposed

 

HD-96

Amanda Batten (52.5%)

Mark Downey 46.3(%)

 

HD-97

Scott Wyatt (55.6%)

Kevin Washington (26.6%)

 

HD-98

Del. Keith Hodges (66.6%)

Ella Webster (33.3%)

 

HD-99

Del. Margaret Ransone (62.3%)

Francis Edwards (37.6%)

 

HD-100

Del. Rob Bloxom (51.9%)

Phil Hernandez (48%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local Election Results

Election Results for the Boards of Supervisors in Fairfax, Prince William, and Loudoun Counties

 

Fairfax County: While the overall political composition of the incoming Fairfax County Board of Supervisors remains identical to the last board, there were three retirements of long-serving supervisors which ushers in a new political era for the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. In total, the three retirements (Bulova, Hudgins, and Cook) represent nearly sixty years of collective service on the Board. In  total, there are four new supervisors as current Lee District Supervisor Jeff McKay won the contest for Chairman, making way for Supervisor-Elect Rodney Lusk to fill the vacancy created through McKay’s election to the at-large position. The sole remaining Republican on the Board of Supervisors is Pat Herrity who narrowly survived re-election and secured a fourth term on the Board. The Board’s composition is now 9-1 Democratic majority.

 

District

Winner

Defeated

Notes

At-Large

Sup. Jeff McKay (66%)

Joe Galdo (34%)

 

Braddock

James Walkinshaw (59.6%)

Jason Remer (34.1%)

 

Dranesville

Sup. John Foust (64.3%)

Ed Martin (35.3%)

 

Hunter Mill

Walter Alcorn&

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